Ventilation in nursing homes

Q -Tip No. 1

Q -Tip No.1

Do not mistake my Q-Tip

to that kind that you clean your ears with.

My Q-Tip is a Quotable Tip,

and as the term implies,

you can quote it anytime, anywhere.

The main difference between my Q -Tip and your Q -Tip

is that my Q -Tip can be inserted thru your left ear

and then pulled out from the right ear.

Try this with your Q -Tip.

My Quotable Tip No. 1 takes into account the multiple deaths from Covid-19 in nursing homes, seniors homes, auxiliary hospitals and any other relative buildings which are of the closed ventilation type for the occupants. These buildings require mechanical ventilation to force air inside the building. the ventilating systems common for these types of buildings would consist of a furnace or heater in the basement or an air conditioner on the roof.

It can go without saying that the air inside these buildings is for common consumption and thereby lies the danger of infecting the occupants with virus from any single resident. Now it is arguable that the Covid-19 virus may not be airborne but this argument still has no basis for conclusions. Whether it can be airborne or not. it will be safer to assume that it can be airborne as much as it can be inside droplets of liquid. Besides, the air I am specifying is actually humidified, which means it has enough moisture that it can hold.

Which gives rise to a detailed rundown of what a closed ventilating system looks like. In a nursing home, the air is heated by a furnace in the basement. This has a supervisor or a technician to oversee its operation. Fresh air, about 10% to 20% is sucked in from outside, is mixed with air recirculated from the building, is passed through the heating elements, is forced through a water humidifier, and then distributed to the rooms through air vents. The recirculated air is sucked in through the vents which are placed strategically apart from the hot air vents. Both the incoming air and the return air are situated at the bottom of the rooms. This makes the hot air stay at the ceiling and the cold air nearer the floor. If the air is infected, it stays up there for a while.

If the covid-19 virus will spread, it will be through the upper space inside the room or corridors. This is humidified air. The virus may be killed when it passes the heater but the humidified air does not pass the heater. So what could be obtained is humidified air floating around the building and used air remaining inside the ducts waiting to be recirculated.. This portion of air inside the building produces the risk of infection and only about 10% of it is replaced with fresh air. Perhaps an efficient use of the manual switch of the furnace blower to suck in more outside air is logical.

What could have been done for added safety is to add or tape air vent filters all over the place. These air vent filters are available in hardware stores and can be doubled together for better effect. Other more expensive systems of sanitation may be used. like effective air sterilizing equipment with water sprayers.

This Quotable Tip is making the assumption that dishes are diligently washed clean.