The Big Goof-Up

We Canadians have seen much of foreign journalists srew up

on the news that they actually report askewdly.

(if there is such a word as askewdly, but you know what I mean)

Sad it is to say that Canadians are goofing off right now

in reporting about Meng Wanzhou, and China relatively.

And I will say it outright, the CBC NEWS hosts are too much engrossed

in Canada being a Country of Laws.

I agree, of course, and that is the veritable truth:

Canadians are a nation of Laws.

But then again CBC NEWS ought to know what they are talking about.

This whole Wangzhou affair

has got the Chinese rapping wood on their rafters.

For good reason, nobody is sent to prison there

if one did  not  do  anything  wrong.

Meng  was  sent  to  prison  just  like  that.

And EXTRADITION is new to the Chinese law books.

It is therefore justifiable, for the Chinese

to stick this Canadian guy to prison

without any charges laid

 which we expect to be drummed up soon.

Anyhow, it is a tooth for a tooth, an eye for en eye,

and a jail for a jail with no charges laid.

But let us now see how much CBC NEWS know 

about the Rule of Law in Canada.

For the charge violating the sanctions against Iran,

Canada cannot extradite Meng because

it is America that has the sanctions against Iran.

Canada does not have sanctions against Iran.

For Meng to be extradited, her offense against America

must also be considered an offense in Canada.

This would be the first item that Meng’s defense lawyers would put up.

This is one prime article in the Extradition Treaty between Us and Canada.

And talking about this Extradition treaty,

the US would have only one charge

that may have a slim chance of sticking–

that of Annexes 12 and 16 (specifically annex 16)

which would be the charge of

“Fraud by a banker, agent, or by a director or officer of any company”

But then again, if this happened in Iran

this still will not stick because Canada

does not have any sanctions on Iran.

Canada may take into consideration

that this type of fraud (whatever it is)

may also constitute an offense in Canada,

in which case extradition may be considered.

But then again, it did not happen in Canada

so there.

The question is: will that guy being imprisoned in China

be able to afford a $10 million bail

as an eye for an eye?

 

(to CBC news, read first before you jump)

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